Prints by Jeffrey Bast

biomedicalephemera:

Wound closure techniques ca. 1855.
Fig 1. Closure of the wound without sutures, using adhesives and cloth.Fig 2. Simple interrupted suture.Fig 3. Simple uninterrupted suture.Fig 4. Interfolded suture, with stabilizing rods. Suture passes under wound and is pulled together despite no stitches over the wound site.Fig 5. “Suture en zigzags” - Continuous horizontal mattress suture.Fig 6. Twisted suture. Dieffenbach used this stitch in the early steps of his reconstructive surgery.Fig 7. Suture needle holder.Fig 8. Curved suture needles.
Précis iconographique de Médecine Opératoire et d’Anatomie Chirurgicale. Drs. Bernard and Huette, 1854.

biomedicalephemera:

Wound closure techniques ca. 1855.

Fig 1. Closure of the wound without sutures, using adhesives and cloth.
Fig 2. Simple interrupted suture.
Fig 3. Simple uninterrupted suture.
Fig 4. Interfolded suture, with stabilizing rods. Suture passes under wound and is pulled together despite no stitches over the wound site.
Fig 5. “Suture en zigzags” - Continuous horizontal mattress suture.
Fig 6. Twisted suture. Dieffenbach used this stitch in the early steps of his reconstructive surgery.
Fig 7. Suture needle holder.
Fig 8. Curved suture needles.

Précis iconographique de Médecine Opératoire et d’Anatomie Chirurgicale. Drs. Bernard and Huette, 1854.

(via scientificillustration)

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